The Northern Way

There is vil­lage of shamans in the far north where snow is every­where. In the vil­lage there is a wood­en house with a sauna. First the shamans pre­pare the sauna. By the time it's very hot, the trainees en­ter the house, about 3 or 4 youths, they take off all clothes and just sit in the sauna for a while, hav­ing a sil­ly chat and all. Once they start sweat­ing a lot, they be­gin to work out and the el­der shamans stretch them for about an hour or so, un­til the bod­ies are as loose as pos­si­ble. It's nev­er a bad idea to take in some al­co­hol for brav­ery and to loosen the body more, so the prepa­ra­tion is al­so a lit­tle bit of a par­ty, but north­ern peo­ple al­ways love to turn every­thing in­to a par­ty. And of course some very good par­ty tricks are demon­strat­ed here, too.

Af­ter an hour or more, the youths are all lim­ber, they're laugh­ing and blush­ing a lot be­cause of the al­co­hol and see­ing each oth­er's naked bod­ies in so many stretchy po­si­tions. Now it's about time to lead them out­side the sauna to the cold white street. The el­ders take one of the trainees who seems to be "ready", to the street, wear­ing just a small loin­cloth. The trainee's skin is very smooth and red­dish af­ter the sauna, the hair is wet, the body is all warm, beau­ti­ful­ly slen­der and flex­i­ble, well pre­pared for the wildest con­tor­tion fan­tasies. He strikes his best po­si­tion and re­lax­es. It's im­por­tant to cap­ture the best mo­ment of it, so a shaman quick­ly splash­es a huge buck­et of wa­ter all over the trainee and an­oth­er shaman im­me­di­ate­ly casts a freez­ing spell.

With­in a few sec­onds they get an ide­al ice sculp­ture. Then goes the sec­ond trainee, and so on. With an artis­tic ap­proach they build a va­ri­ety of com­plex pos­tures, even the pos­tures where no body part is left un­stretched, so to speak. Some­times it works to­geth­er with a telekine­sis spell to avoid get­ting frozen along with the trainee while stretch­ing him, as well as to build some of the most aes­thet­ic sculp­ture com­po­si­tions that would make peo­ple guess how it was even pos­si­ble to achieve that po­si­tion...

Af­ter all the "sculp­tures" are com­plete, the shamans leave them for ex­hi­bi­tion and the sculp­tures stay there for a few days, ad­mired by the vil­lagers. Then the shamans take them care­ful­ly back to the sauna house where they melt and the youths are giv­en cups of hot tea and then some nice mas­sage. They dis­cuss how good were their "sculp­tures" and how much peo­ple en­joyed them. Then they spend more time in the sauna to see just how flex­i­ble they got af­ter stay­ing stretched for sev­er­al days like that. Fi­nal­ly, they have a nice din­ner and go to sleep.

Some­times, when lucky enough, the trainees could get a paint­ing or two of what their "sculp­tures" looked like, done by a pro­fes­sion­al painter. The shamans some­times hire a good painter when one of the sculp­tures "turned out" to look par­tic­u­lar­ly in­ter­est­ing. Of course any of the trainees would be over­joyed to get a paint­ing like that, so they can hang it on the wall in their house or con­sid­er to sell it to the small lo­cal mu­se­um for every­body to en­joy. Some­times they could even hire ac­tu­al sculp­tors to im­mor­tal­ize the ice sculp­ture in mar­ble. But of course the beau­ty of the ac­tu­al ice sculp­tures is val­ued above every­thing else and the trainees can be very cre­ative with their flex­i­bil­i­ty and self-ex­pres­sion.

See al­so