Artei's Adventures

This is a char­ac­ter from my new TES IV: Obliv­ion ses­sion start­ed on Feb­ru­ary 22nd, 2009. This time I'm not go­ing to do the main quest, in­stead just role-play­ing and trav­el­ling here and there un­til the char­ac­ter is "ready" to slay the Dae­dra.

This ses­sion fea­tures quite a num­ber of mods as well as my own man­u­al tweaks. Yes­ter­day af­ter some in­tense re­search I fi­nal­ly man­aged to get him to be­come a true con­tor­tion­ist, some­thing that was like my dream since last sum­mer! xD

So I thought I'd show off a lit­tle as it's re­lat­ed to my spe­cial­i­ty on DA, lol. You can tell I'm a screen­shot whore though! I must have made al­most a thou­sand Obliv­ion screen­shots over­all... omg...

Though some caps may be sor­ta "pix­e­ly" as I've just re­cent­ly fig­ured how to en­able both HDR light­ing and an­tialias­ing!

I love mak­ing up sto­ries, so since the game says noth­ing about the char­ac­ter's past, I thought I must make some­thing up on my own, ^-^ so here we go:

===

The Sto­ry

Artei is an or­phan raised by wan­der­ing jug­glers who found him as a lit­tle poor Bre­ton kid hid­ing un­der the bridge. They fed him and the boy told them his par­ents were killed by the mon­sters that at­tacked their vil­lage, but he man­aged to es­cape. The troupe of­fered him to join and he fol­lowed them. They be­came his new fam­i­ly and helped him to mas­ter the art of jug­gling.

The boy had a rather odd habit of stretch­ing in the morn­ing, rais­ing his arms and arch­ing the tor­so un­til his spine pro­duced a se­ries of soft pop­ping sounds, while his body demon­strat­ed an un­usu­al de­gree of flex­i­bil­i­ty. The man who was his teacher asked him about this habit and Artei told him that his dad and mom would of­ten make theirs spines crack while work­ing in the gar­den and then they'd laugh and say it felt like they on­ly just start­ed work­ing. And the man fig­ured that Artei was se­cret­ly try­ing to copy­cat his old par­ents but it took a lot more ef­fort for his young joints to pro­duce said sounds, so he was un­con­scious­ly work­ing hard on in­creas­ing his spine's flex­i­bil­i­ty.

The man en­cour­aged Artei to try grab­bing his foot and pulling it to his head from be­hind, and it wasn't much sur­pris­ing that while do­ing so the boy was per­fect­ly ca­pa­ble of get­ting his heel be­yond his own col­lar­bone. Next, with a lit­tle help from his teacher, he was able to lay on his chest while hav­ing both of his feet stand­ing on the ground next to his shoul­ders (so called "chest­stand"). It suprised even the boy him­self as he'd nev­er have thought of do­ing some­thing like this.

Need­less to say, Artei's new­ly dis­cov­ered tal­ent took the form of ac­ro­bat­ic stunts and was im­me­di­ate­ly in­cor­po­rat­ed in­to their jug­gling per­for­mances and not with­out suc­cess, as their dai­ly in­come near­ly dou­bled. Artei was en­cour­aged to work hard­er and in a few months was ca­pa­ble of fold­ing his body back­wards in half, while at the same time stand­ing on his hands, some­thing that al­ways made the crowd gasp in awe!

Soon the war with Dae­dra re­newed and for the sec­ond time Artei had lost his en­tire fam­i­ly as they were slaugh­tered by the Daedric sol­diers right in front of his eyes while he hid him­self in a tiny niche un­der some build­ing and man­aged to sur­vive. Af­ter a few weeks of liv­ing as a beg­gar, the boy was no­ticed by a priest who brought him to his pri­o­ry, say­ing that he was giv­en a sign about the boy and that Artei's des­tiny is now in the hands of the Nine. Artei was trained to han­dle the sword as well as taught every­thing from the an­cient scrip­tures.

Af­ter turn­ing 20, Artei left the pri­o­ry and joined a few guilds to help him prac­tice the skills most im­por­tant for his quest to de­stroy Dae­dra. While prac­tic­ing his sword fight­ing and heal­ing mag­ic, he didn't for­get about ac­ro­bat­ics and his flex­i­bil­i­ty still served him well dur­ing the hard days, as his morals kept him from steal­ing and killing in­no­cent peo­ple or an­i­mals.

See al­so