Arcus: Competition Stretch

Ar­cus stretch­ing for a sur­prise trick for the ac­ro­bat­ic dance com­pe­ti­tion-- ac­ro­bats and dancers are very pop­u­lar in the king­dom of As­modeus, so the more at­trac­tive young slaves are ex­pect­ed to be skill­ful at danc­ing, bend­ing and bal­anc­ing. Their mas­ters are de­mand­ing when it comes to the skill, but good per­form­ers are al­ways high­ly re­ward­ed and de­spite their slave sta­tus they of­ten lead a pret­ty lux­u­ri­ous life; maybe it's one of the rea­sons why king As­modeus de­cid­ed to make prince Ar­cus a dancer af­ter en­slav­ing him (ex­cit­ed by his beau­ty, the king could dream of noth­ing but Ar­cus per­form­ing for him). Of course, it was a se­cret, but he did every­thing to find the best ac­ro­bat­ics teacher for Ar­cus, that teacher's pupils were very well known for their per­for­mances and liv­ing in lux­u­ry, so every­body con­sid­ered Ar­cus damn lucky.

The train­ing was hard but --since the an­cient times when God cursed Lu­cifer-- every de­mon was ad­dict­ed to pain, so like every­one else, Ar­cus was used to find a spe­cial joy in bear­ing it, rather than run­ning away cry­ing like a ba­by hu­man (de­mon kids, on the con­trary, loved to re­ceive a good slap on the butt from their par­ents every once in a while). His teacher was care­ful but his hands were strong and de­ter­mined to dis­cov­er all the se­crets of Ar­cus's body, so to say. Ar­cus was se­cret­ly thank­ful that his bor­ing life as a prince end­ed and was try­ing his best to be­come a good dancer, so it wasn't a sur­prise when in the end he was about to take part in the big com­pe­ti­tion with all the chances to win.

For the com­pe­ti­tion Ar­cus chose to wear a tiny sky blue loin­cloth and his fa­vorite ear rings-- and pret­ty much noth­ing else as ac­ro­bat­ic dance was first of all sup­posed to show the beau­ty of a well trained flex­i­ble body in mo­tion, so a lit­tle cloth­ing was on­ly used to give it some va­ri­ety. The dance was go­ing to be about a poor boy who got cap­tured and tor­ment­ed by two sol­diers, Ar­cus's dra­mat­ic ex­pres­sion and skill­ful twist­ing of his young tanned body was go­ing to cre­ate the at­mos­phere of a hell­ish tor­ture cham­ber while at the same time demon­strat­ing the beau­ties of ac­ro­bat­ics. At the end Ar­cus would slow­ly slide in the split, the two "tor­men­tors" would ap­proach him to grab his feet and raise them in the air on­ly to keep push­ing un­til both of his feet met above his head where they would get locked with a big iron chain. Rais­ing his hands, Ar­cus would bal­ance stand­ing on his hips on­ly, then let his tor­so slow­ly melt in­to a deep bow back­wards, sym­bol­iz­ing the cap­tive's death-- no­tably, demons nev­er en­joyed things that hu­mans find "en­joy­able" but the mo­tives of slay­ing the weak, chal­leng­ing one's body, as well as bat­tles be­tween the strong to find the strongest have al­ways been very pop­u­lar, though I per­son­al­ly wouldn't think of demons as some kind of bar­bar­ians, be­cause as de­scen­dants of Lu­cifer and his archangels, they still of­ten had some­thing an­gel­ic about their ap­pear­ance and man­ners, though God's curse changed their pref­er­ences com­plete­ly: it is be­lieved that by turn­ing his an­gels in­to in­creas­ing­ly cru­el demons God him­self has cre­at­ed the weapon of self-de­struc­tion, but even though any de­mon is worth ten an­gels in willpow­er and strength, the num­ber of the de­mon­ic rebels is still way too small and their pow­ers are still far not enough to gath­er for a se­ri­ous at­tack on the Pearly Gates, though prophets say that hav­ing a ded­i­cat­ed spir­it, the fi­nal vic­to­ry is on­ly a mat­ter of time...

See al­so