Amphora

This is for my dear Aldric with whom we dis­cussed the an­cient Greece and how beau­ti­ful it was, so I want­ed to draw some­thing about it :3

The paint­ings on ce­ram­ic vas­es were one of the very first known cas­es of de­pic­tion of var­i­ous ran­dom life as­pects, oth­er than the stan­dard deities, he­roes and myths. Af­ter hav­ing dis­cov­ered the ce­ram­ic paint­ing around 550 BC, the an­cient Greeks had fi­nal­ly start­ed to look around them­selves in the search for themes.

Of course, the beau­ti­ful ath­letes at­tract­ed the most at­ten­tion of the ce­ram­ic artists as the Greeks be­lieved in the nude hu­man body be­ing the re­flec­tion of the soul. The rich­er one's body was in ex­pres­sion, the rich­er was his soul.

Be­cause of this, the Greeks taught their youths to do var­i­ous beau­ti­ful things with their bod­ies since an ear­ly age. Teenagers were sought to be very pli­ant, soft and flex­i­ble. Many youths en­joyed wear­ing tight belts to ac­cen­tu­ate the soft­ness of their bod­ies, they prac­ticed the art of ac­ro­bat­ics and body bend­ing, then switched to mus­cle build­ing and all kinds of ath­let­ic games af­ter en­ter­ing their twen­ties.

The ath­letes en­joyed the priv­i­lege of be­ing nude when­ev­er they want­ed, there was no prej­u­dice against the naked hu­man body as long as it was fit and beau­ti­ful.

It wasn't a rare sight to see a beau­ti­ful man proud­ly cross­ing the street in the shade of stone pil­lars and green trees, wear­ing noth­ing but a head­band pro­tect­ing his long curly hair from the wind, his mus­cled chest lift­ed up, stom­ach sucked in and his back bear­ing the most grace­ful curve from the shoul­ders down to the toned cheeks. Chil­dren looked up to him as a hero and old men smiled at him like shep­herds who saw a beau­ti­ful an­i­mal in the wild.

The Olympics Games were the great­est cel­e­bra­tion of the nude body as hun­dreds of ath­letes of all ages and from all the near­by coun­tries, in­clud­ing Egypt, Per­sia and all the Hel­lenic king­doms, gath­ered to per­form their very best for a whole week, every four years.

Many ce­ram­ic vas­es were de­stroyed by the Ro­mans who tor­ment­ed the Greek civ­i­liza­tion, but many of them were sold to the mer­chants and rulers of Chi­na, Per­sia, In­dia and Egypt where they re­mained un­harmed to the present day.

See al­so